Extending MoT test period ‘could cause road deaths’

Extending MoT test period ‘could cause road deaths’
Extending MoT test period ‘could cause road deaths’

The Government proposal to extend the period before a car must undergo its first MoT will put lives at risk according to a consumer motoring site.

Top five causes of failure during a car’s first MoT at three years

1) Lighting -169,000 failures
2) Tyres – 101,000 failures
3) Driver’s view of the road – 98,000 failures
4) Brakes – 60,000 failures
5) Suspension – 27,000 failures

The controversial planned changes to the MoT test will increase the number of unsafe vehicles on Britain’s roads say HonestJohn.co.uk following analysis of Government figures.

The Government’s plans to extend the annual roadworthiness test from three to four years – which is currently undergoing a consultation period – could mean 385,000 vehicles that would have failed their first MoT will slip through the net and remain on the road unrepaired.

HonestJohn.co.uk analysed millions of previously unseen MoT records from the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) and found that one in six cars were refused a roadworthiness certificate during the first MoT, with most failing due to unsafe brakes, lights and tyres.

The revelation comes after HonestJohn.co.uk published the MoT Files for the first time in three years, following a Freedom of Information (FoI) request and protracted fight with the DVSA to make the data public.

The consumer site say: “Success in this long-running battle means that for the first time in years owners and prospective buyers once again have detailed access to the latest MoT records and reasons for failure. It has been published in full at HonestJohn.co.uk/mot”

Top five cars for passing the first MoT

1) Lexus RX 450h – 94%
2) Honda Jazz – 93%
3) Mazda MX-5 – 93%
4) Volkswagen Golf Plus – 92%
5) Audi Q5 – 92%

The worst car manufacturers for the first MoT in 2016 were Chevrolet, Citroen and Dacia, with respective pass rates of 78 per cent, 79 per cent and 81 per cent. Honda, Porsche and Subaru all hold a collective first place, with the trio showing a first year average pass rate of 91 per cent.

The car with the highest pass rate during the first MoT in 2016 was the Lexus RX 450h with an impressive score of 94 per cent. The Honda Jazz was second (93 per cent), followed by the Mazda MX-5 (93 per cent), Volkswagen Golf Plus (92 per cent) and the Audi Q5 (92 per cent).

Bottom five cars for passing the first MoT

1) Peugeot 5008 67% pass rate
2) Citroen DS4 73% pass rate
3) Renault Megane 74% pass rate
4) Ford Galaxy 75% pass rate
5) Chevrolet Spark 76% pass rate

Daniel Powell, Managing Editor of HonestJohn.co.uk said: “Many of the common failure items are down to general maintenance, rather than a particular fault with the car.

“The Government’s proposal to extend the first MoT from three to four years will effectively give irresponsible motorists a free pass to drive dangerous cars for an additional 12 months, without any mandatory safety checks.”

Saving drivers money

The Government say that the proposals would save motorists more than £100 million a year in the UK. Northern Ireland already operates a longer exemption as do a number of European countries including France, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Denmark and Norway.

Speaking when the consultation was launched, Andrew Jones MP said: “New vehicles are much safer than they were 50 years ago and so it is only right we bring the MOT test up to date to help save motorists money where we can.”

A Department for Transport spokesperson said today: “We have some of the safest roads in the world and MOT tests play an important role in ensuring the standard of vehicles on our roads. With modern vehicles and new technology it is only right we consider if we can change MOT test to help save motorists money where we can.

“We consulted on whether to move the first test for new vehicles to four years. We are considering responses carefully and no decisions have been taken.”

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