Ben Lowry: Trump state visit seems to be on hold, which is no bad thing

FILE - In this April 9, 2017 file photo, White House chief strategist Steve Bannon steps off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Bannon, a forceful but divisive presence in President Donald Trump's White House, is leaving. Trump accepted Bannon's resignation Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, ending a turbulent seven months for his chief strategist, the latest to depart from the president's administration in turmoil.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
FILE - In this April 9, 2017 file photo, White House chief strategist Steve Bannon steps off Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Bannon, a forceful but divisive presence in President Donald Trump's White House, is leaving. Trump accepted Bannon's resignation Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, ending a turbulent seven months for his chief strategist, the latest to depart from the president's administration in turmoil. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

What a shambles is the Trump presidency.

Now America’s commander-in-chief gets rid of the man who helped get him to the White House, Steve Bannon, who masterminded the Trump campaign’s success in tapping into the fears of disillusioned, white, blue collar workers.

Few tears will be shed for a strategist who was seen as close to white supremacists.

But did Mr Trump not know the first thing about Bannon’s world view?

And Bannon cannot be surprised that, working under a man as unpredictable as Trump, he has fallen out of favour with him.

A long succession of people have done since the presidency began in January.

It seems that only two types of people will thrive as Trump staffers – slavish yes men and members of the Trump family.

While of course Britain is right to work hard to take advantage of Mr Trump’s support for Brexit and his apparent keenness to strike a trade deal with Britain Theresa May was a little too hasty to offer a state visit.

In any event his view on that could change tomorrow, and then change back days later, and then reverse course again soon after that, and so on.

One thing the UK has is tradition and class and prestige and history.

Some of this tradition has been debased by rushing out knighthoods to sports stars and celebrities if they achieve something major in a short space of time, rather than basing these honours on decades of achievement.

But for all that debasement, leaders around the world still covet invites to royal events and so on.

Needless to say US presidents are at the front of the queue when it comes to invitations of all kinds.

But while it is one thing for the London to stay as close as possible to Washington as a matter of strategy, it is another to hurry a state visit for a man who has behaved as Trump done.

A state visit to be held soon was the plan.

Now the visit seems to be on the shelf, which is no bad thing for Britain’s reputation.

• Ben Lowry (@BenLowry2) is News Letter deputy editor

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