Families of GB soldiers who died in NI should always be welcome here

Morning View
Morning View
0
Have your say

Fourteen relatives of four soldier victims of a 1984 IRA bomb in Fermanagh travelled to Enniskillen yesterday for a plaque unveiling in their memory.

The attack was particularly grisly because the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers men were off-duty and had just returned from a day’s fishing when the blast went off. Two, Thomas Agar and Robert Huggins, died in the attack while Peter Gallimore died five months later from his injuries. Clive Aldridge was maimed but lived until recently.

The plaque was unveiled at the Royal British Legion in Enniskillen. One of the widows who attended, Annette Gallimore from Lancashire, initially decided she would not attend because of the pain of the memories, but she did go to the ceremony and found it “very difficult and emotional”.

There was a good turnout from local politicians, including the First Minister and DUP leader Arlene Foster, the DUP MLA Maurice Morrow and the Ulster Unionist MP Tom Elliott. Other people in attendance were a doctor and a fireman who attended the scene that day.

Much credit must go to South East Fermanagh Foundation, which organised the event and which does good work with terror victims, many of whom live in isolated areas.

Kenny Donaldson of SEFF says that the group will “continue to reach out to the families of regular British Army soldiers who are hurting in silence throughout Great Britain and who have unfinished business with this place”.

These servicemen died or were injured after putting their lives at risk to protect the people of Northern Ireland.

All anyone ever hears about now is collusion and reported state brutality, when the true story of the Troubles was of brave and restrained security forces who patiently worked to suppress terrorist murder and mayhem.

As a society we must do everything we can to extend the hand of friendship to the still grieving relatives of soldiers from GB who died for us.