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Greysteel killer: 'I am a changed man'

THE loyalist killer who served seven years out of eight life sentences for the murder of four Catholic workmen at the "trick or treat" Greysteel massacre in 1993 has said that he just wants to be allowed to get on with his life.

Coleraine man Torrens Knight said he has also distanced himself from terror groups.

"I have changed, I have moved away from paramilitaries. Yes, I am an ex-terrorist, but there are plenty of other ex-prisoners out there also," he said.

"I have done my time and I have let go of my hatred. It's been eight years (since Knight's release from jail under the Good Friday Agreement] and I have bothered nobody.

"I am just trying to get on with my life."

Knight said he has grown up a lot since the atrocity.

"I have changed. I have grown up a lot since back then," he said.

"In prison I had a lot of time to reflect and I try to look at other people's perspectives now. I know some people would be happier to see the likes of me spend the rest of our lives in prison but we have all made mistakes and I can understand that, but I was let out early by the government and I just have to try and get on with my life.

"I could have come out of prison and got involved in paramilitaries again or gone down the road of criminality, but I chose not to."

Knight said the millions of pounds being spent on public inquiries could be better spent on issues which the whole community share, such as the state of the health service.

"We can't sweep the past below the carpet and we shouldn't, but pouring millions of pounds into inquiries that won't achieve a lot won't help," he said.

He further accused nationalist politicians of waging a hate campaign against him.

He has challenged nationalist politicians to "get off my back please".

"There has been a hate campaign against me since I came out of prison. I have kept my head down and tried not to get into it, but I am fed up with it," he said.

Knight's candid interview with the Coleraine Times came after claims were made in the media that he was a member of Kilrea Apprentice Boys.

But he said: "I am not in the Apprentice Boys, but if I was, is it such a big deal when Martin McGuinness and others are in the government of this country?

"They portray themselves as men of peace, but they don't seem to want to let go of the past. Are they the ones with the problem?"

 
 
 

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