DCSIMG

TEAM NI: Squash hopeful Madeline Perry exorcises some demons in Glasgow

Northern Ireland's Dave Readle and James Brown in the Men's Para-Sport 1000m Time Trial B Tandem Final

Northern Ireland's Dave Readle and James Brown in the Men's Para-Sport 1000m Time Trial B Tandem Final

  • by Nigel Ringland
 

Four years ago Madeline Perry was inconsolable after losing her quarter-final of the Delhi Commonwealth Games to Australian Kasey Brown.

Perry was two sets up in that match before losing the next three – she was shattered by the experience.

On Friday the 37-year-old served up revenge on a silver platter as she beat Brown in four tough games to exorcise one of her worst days as a professional – 11-4, 10-12, 11-8, 11-5.

“Obviously, I would have rather won in Delhi more but it was good to get revenge today,” explained the current world number 11.

“I had so much support which was nice, I felt like in Delhi I had let everyone down because you are always playing for yourself and I kind off bottled it there so I was determined to push through and show what I was made off.”

Dame Mary Peters was among those who watched on alongside Chef de Mission of the Northern Ireland team Robert McVeigh as Perry started strongly.

She had that steely determined look in her eyes as punishing rally followed punishing rally, many which ended with a ‘let’ and had to be replayed.

There was clearly no love lost between the two players.

Perry admitted: “She annoyed me at one point to be honest, I mean I always have tough matches against her, there are a lot of ‘lets’ which isn’t pretty and I don’t really enjoy but its one of those things but I was 4-2 down in the third game and I was trying to get a ‘let’ and she said my shot was rubbish so that didn’t go down well with me and I went from 2-4 down to 8-4 up.”

The first game was won comfortably but at 9-9 in the second, Perry missed an easy put away and the Australian went on to clinch it 12-10.

Would there be a wobble?

“I still felt like I was in control of all the rallies but I just let it sneak away from me,” she added.

“However, I knew I was making her work really hard and I just wanted to keep control and make it tough by making the court as big as I could and I think I did that really well and then in the fourth game I did that again.”

It’s the third Commonwealth Games in a row Perry has reached the last eight and in her fifth appearance for Northern Ireland she would love to go further for the first time but it won’t be easy as she’ll face the fourth ranked player in the world, Joelle King from New Zealand.

“This result doesn’t get me a medal, does it? If I’d won the game in Delhi I would have had that medal as there wasn’t a bronze medal play-off due to an injury but Delhi was stressful for me because I put way too much pressure on myself,” Perry said.

“I’ve achieved so much in my career and I don’t want this medal to become the be all and end all because I’ve done so much, more than I could have ever dreamt off.

“It’s all about enjoying it this time and even though I looked a bit tense on court at times I was really enjoying the battle.”

Perry added: “Looking forward to the next match, I’m going to get on the show court now and it’s a great atmosphere and a great court and I’m going to take it one game at a time.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page