EU is more than economics

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It’s good to see Lord Kilclooney (little church/wood in the meadow) (News Letter July 14) taking a leaf out of Taoiseach Enda Kenny’s book and advising the good people south of the border (I note his advice is solely based on economic arguments), to Irexit in the wake of Britain’s Brexit ie. to aim at becoming an Autarky’s shadow; as Britain will very likely become an economic (and ultimately political) Autarky, post-EU.

It may find itself in some very interesting and colourful company.

It is a twist of history that Britain, as soon as it invokes Article 50, will find itself in a similar position to that of Ireland following Ireland’s exit from the UK in the 1920s.

It was a cold and lonely place to be and absolutely contrary to good economic sense. However, Ireland survived, admittedly at great economic cost and hardship to its people.

As Britain is a mature and developed economy (which a politically independent Ireland back then wasn’t), it should not be quite as hard for its people, when they find themselves descending into a quasi-Autarky - depending on the kindness of the EU, and others, to give them economic assistance.

Poor old Ireland had to survive on its own following political independence.

If Britain had left the EEC in the early years, Ireland, because of its near full economic dependence on Britain back then, would probably have had no other choice, but to follow suit. This is no longer the case.

Ireland’s trading patterns are now much more diverse and, yes, there will be trading dislocation following the Brexit, but nothing too perilous that can’t be overcome with a little help from Britain and the EU.

Unlike, Lord Kilclooney, many Europeans, including myself, don’t see the EU as purely and simply an economic entity.

They see it as a coming together, in peace and harmony, of the wonderfully diverse family/peoples of Europe, with all their richness of languages and cultures which, hopefully, one day will embrace that great European nation, Russia.

Surely that vision is worth more than lots of lucre.

Micheal O’Cathail, Fermanagh