The future of the UK depends on Ulster’s loyalty

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Not for the first time the future of the UK rests heavily on Ulster’s loyalty and devotion.

As Arlene Foster and the DUP engage with the Conservative Party there are perhaps two major considerations they must bear in mind.

The first is that peace is not a “process” but a right.

If after 20 years peace is not fully cemented, it is clearly not peace which is the objective. Those who cry that Brexit, the absence of an Irish Language Act or some other demand is a ‘threat’ to the “peace process” are in fact threatening NI and its citizens with terrorism.

The second is that Ulster is an equal part of the UK, indeed the first act of the NI Parliament was to formally vote to be a part of the UK.

No English politician has authority, legal or moral to legislate for Ulster’s future outside the Union.

Should the Conservative administration which now depends on DUP support seek to exert pressure to accommodate Sinn Fein then the compromise can obviously only be that “we will sit in government with the murderers of our people when you admit Isis to your cabinet”.

Robert Wallace, Portadown