IRISH LEAGUE: ‘I can turn around the Ports’ says Currie

Portadown manager Niall Currie following the recent 3-0 defeat by Ards. Pic by Pacemaker.

Portadown manager Niall Currie following the recent 3-0 defeat by Ards. Pic by Pacemaker.

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Portadown manager Niall Currie is calling on the club’s supporters to accept short-term pain towards long-term gain.

Currie arrived as boss of his hometown club in December but has had an initial positive impact disrupted by a six-game losing streak in the Danske Bank Premiership.

The Ports sit stranded at the bottom of the senior standings, adrift of Carrick Rangers by 12 points entering the closing stages of the campaign.

Currie has issued a rally cry in the face of growing unrest from within the fanbase following Saturday’s 3-0 defeat to an Ards side also struggling for form.

“I can turn around the Ports,” said Currie. “I will put everything I have into working for the club to improve our situation.

“If, at the end, people judge I do not have the quality to be Portadown manager then I will deal with that in the knowledge I have given it my all.

“But all I want is that same level of commitment from every player in the squad.

“The fans have every right to criticise the manager or players and I will take that on the chin.

“You see the crowds coming out and backing the club and you think there needs to be more pride in the shirt of what is a great name in the Irish League.”

Currie’s focus remains divided between immediate targets and future goals.

“I have the backing of the Board of Directors in terms of time and am still excited about what we can all achieve together at this club,” he said. “I came into this club aware it was going to take time to get everything back on track.

“I admit it has come as a surprise just how deep-rooted many of the problems are and issues from the past continue to make it difficult to move forward in the way I would like.

“Three or four players are sorting out futures at other clubs, which they can obviously do as free agents this summer, but it just adds to the uncertainty around the place.

“I was aware to a degree of some of the problems but it is only since I have been here and seen everything myself that I really understand how this is a long-term situation.”