DCSIMG

Queen’s boss Thompson relishing quarter-final tie

Distillery's David Wright in action with QUB's James Ferrin

Distillery's David Wright in action with QUB's James Ferrin

  • by John Flack
 

Queen’s University manager Peter Thompson admits he wasn’t surprised at his side’s 2-0 win over Lisburn Distillery which earned the students a place in the quarter-finals of the Irish Cup for the first time.

The Championship 2 side will now meet the winners of the Bangor-Warrenpoint Town replay at the Dub next month.

It was an abject display from the Whites, who could have lost by a bigger margin, although their pre-match preparations were disrupted when manager Tommy Kincaid was taken to hospital with a suspected heart attack.

First team coach Andy Harwood deputised for Kincaid who remained in a stable condition yesterday as he continues to undergo tests.

“I was only told about Tommy’s illness after the game and things like that put football in perspective and our thoughts are with him and his family at this time.” said the Queen’s boss.

“In the lead-up to the game I said we were underdogs but I was playing mind games if I am being honest.”

The students took the lead in the 19th minute when Bertie Fulton hooked the ball home at the near post after Aaron Thompson had flicked on a right wing throw in taken by Daniel Culbert.

Queen’s made it 2-0 in the 51st minute when they were awarded a penalty after Stephen McDowell was sent sprawling in the box by McBride.

The keeper seemed to have made amends when he saved Lavery’s effort diving to his right but Fulton was alert to the rebound and crossed for Michael Allison to score from close range.

“We were awful and I can only apologise to the club and the fans. It’s been a difficult week with the boss and stuff but that’s no excuse.” said Kincaid’s assistant.

“Queen’s won first ball and second ball and played really well whereas we had plenty of experienced players out there and they just didn’t have the right attitude.”

 

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