Stunning pictures showing Northern Ireland at its best!

Delving into the Northern Ireland Tourist Board archive we select some of the best images from across the Province

Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 1:23 pm
Updated Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 1:26 pm

From the coast to the cities and the mountains, including scenes made famous on the big and small screens

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

The festival which was a fantastic, colourful, culturally rich afternoon was a resounding success, and with almost 25,000 in attendance was a true demonstration of the respect for NIâ¬"s ethnic diversity. We are sure all will agree that this was the largest and most successful Mela to date and a true cultural experience for all who attended.
A short coastal footpath leads to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. On the way, there are wonderful vantage points to stop and take in the natural beauty. The geology, flora and fauna have won Carrick-a-Rede recognition as an area of special scientific interest. Fulmars, kittywakes, guillemots and razorbills breed on the islands close to the rope bridge. Of course, Carrick-a-Rede also boasts an exhilarating rope bridge experience. Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge!
An old-fashioned pub, The Duke Of York is welcoming and warm and is one of Belfast's gems. The Venue With its white exterior featuring old-fashioned metal adverts for whiskey and Guinness and hanging flower baskets.
There cannot be a more wild and dramatic place in Northern Ireland than the landscape park of Downhill and Mussenden Temple . The romantic vision of Frederick Hervey, Earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry, he created an elegant mansion at Downhill, which now lies in ruins. On the nearby clifftop the Earl Bishop built the circular Mussenden Temple as his library, modelled on the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli.
Belfast City Hall was designed by Alfred Brumwell Thomas and completed in 1906, it is the home of Belfast City Council. The principle landing and Rotunda area area enriched with marble work similar to the main entrance. A major feature is the mural by Belfast Artist John Luke, depicting the industry and the foundation of the City.
Dunluce Castle is sited dramatically close to the edge of a headland, along the North Antrim coast. Surrounded by jaw dropping coastal scenery, this medieval castle stands where an early Irish fort was once built and where its history can be traced back to early Christians and Vikings. Find out more on the Northern Ireland Environment Agency website
North Antrim Coast between Dunluce Castle and Portrush
Saint Columb's Cathedral which has stood on its prominent site inside the famous walls of Derry since 1633. Dedicated to the name of Saint Columba (Columb) who established a Christian settlement here in the sixth century. The historic cathedral has a small museum with pictures and artefacts open daily to visitors. This Cathedral was built in by William Parrot for The Honourable, The Irish Society and is in the Planter Gothic style. The tower and main building are original. The present spire was added in 1821. The Chancel was added in 1887 and the Chapter House in 1910. The Cathedral has many fine stained glass windows, regimental flags, memorials and a large collection of historical items from the time of the siege.
Cushendun stands on an elevated beach at the outflow of the Glendun and Glencorp valleys. The name in Irish is Cois an Duine, meaning Foot of the Dun, identifying the villageâ¬"s location at the mouth of the River Dun. The pretty village was designed by Clough William Ellis in 1912 at the request of Ronald John McNeill, Baron Cushendun. The picturesque Cornish appearance was deliberate, to please the Baronâ¬"s Penzance-born wife, Maud. Ellis designed a village square with seven houses which are today run as craft shops and tea rooms. After Maudâ¬"s death in 1925, Ellis designed a row of whitewashed, quaint cottages in her memory. Baron Cushendun also commissioned neo-Georgian Glenmona House with all the mock pomposity of eighteenth century architecture.
Enniskillen Castle houses the Fermanagh County Museum which has award-winning displays: 'Country People, Country Places: 'The Making of a Landscape', which gives insight into Fermanagh's natural history, archaeology and rural lifestyle.
Sperrins A scenic and wonderfully traffic-free route through mid-Ulster, this is one of the most romantically wild areas in Ireland. The Sperrin Mountains are both rugged and curvaceous with many stopping places of interest particularly for those with an interest in neolithic stone circles.â¬(R)
The Mourne Mountains or Mournes, a granite mountain range located in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland, are among the most famous of the mountains on the island of Ireland. The surrounding area is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is proposed as the first National Park in Northern Ireland. The Mountains of Mourne are partly owned by the National Trust and see a large number of visitors every year. The highest mountain is Slieve Donard at 849 metres (2,786 ft).
Mussenden Temple There cannot be a more wild and dramatic place in Northern Ireland than the landscape park of Downhill. The romantic vision of Frederick Hervey, Earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry, he created an elegant mansion at Downhill, which now lies in ruins. On the nearby clifftop the Earl Bishop built the circular Mussenden Temple as his library, modelled on the Temple of Vesta at Tivoli.
The Mourne Moutnains are among the most famous of the mountains on the island of Ireland. The surrounding area is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is proposed as the first National Park in Northern Ireland.
The Mourne Mountains a granite mountain range located in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland, are among the most famous of the mountains in Ireland. The surrounding area is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is proposed as the first National Park in Northern Ireland.
The Giant's Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the cliff foot and disappear under the sea.The tallest are about 12 metres (36 ft) high, and the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 metres thick in places. It is located on the north-east coast of Northern Ireland, about 3 kilometres (2 miles) north of the town of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986.
The Lanyon Building at Queen's University. Lanyon designed the main building of Queen's University of Belfast in 1849. The building is famous for its Gothic Revival facade and Great Hall. The Great Hall underwent an extensive £2.5m renovation in 2002, restoring it to Lanyon's original plans.
Titanic Boat Tours Scheduled guided Titanic tours take in the historic Harland & Wolff shipyards and the famous Titanic sites around Belfast Harbour. Although many of the riverside Harland & Wolff sheds were demolished in early 2002 and those sites/sights are now gone, their demolition has actually provided a much better view of the Titanic slipways which were previously hidden by these same sheds. The harbour area itself has always been a romantic and mysterious place, full of interesting sights, sounds and history, an exciting place which reeks of adventure and far off places! As a busy working port, most of it has been inaccessible to the public for many years unless you were employed in the shipping or shipbuilding industries, or were a passenger aboard an incoming or outgoing ferry or liner. This tour is a unique opportunity to experience all those exciting travel urges that seem to grip your senses in such a place!