Boris Johnson: Cabinet should ‘chuck out’ Brexit deal

Boris Johnson says the Cabinet should 'chuck out' the Brexit deal
Boris Johnson says the Cabinet should 'chuck out' the Brexit deal

Former foreign secretary Boris Johnson said he would vote against the Brexit deal, claiming it was “vassal state stuff” and urged the Cabinet to “chuck it out”.

He said he expected the deal to be “pretty much” what had been agreed a few week ago “we are going to stay in the customs union on this deal, we are going to stay effectively in large parts of the single market and that means it’s vassal state stuff”.

Jacob Rees-Mogg.

Jacob Rees-Mogg.

He told the BBC: “For the first time in a thousand years, this place, this Parliament, will not have a say over the laws that govern this country. It is a quite incredible state of affairs.”

Mr Johnson added: “For the first time since partition, Dublin - under these proposals - would have more say in some aspects of the government of Northern Ireland than London.

“I don’t see how you can support it from a democratic point of view, I don’t see how unionists can support it, and I don’t see how you can support it if you believe in the economic and political freedom of this country.”

He claimed the deal was “making a nonsense of Brexit so I hope the Cabinet will do the right thing and I hope they chuck it out”.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the leader of the pro-Brexit European Research Group of Tory MPs, said the reported deal represented a betrayal of Theresa May’s promise to maintain the integrity of the United Kingdom.

“White flags have gone up all over Whitehall. It is a betrayal of the Union,” he told the BBC.

“If what we have heard is true, this fails to meet the Conservative Party manifesto and it fails to meet many of the commitments that the Prime Minister makes.

“It would keep us in the customs union and de facto the single market. This is the vassal state.

“It is a failure of the Government’s negotiating position, it is a failure to deliver on Brexit and it is potentially dividing up the United Kingdom.

“It is very hard to see any reason why the Cabinet should support Northern Ireland being ruled from Dublin.”