'My heart is breaking' - daughter who lost both parents in 1987 Remembrance Day Enniskillen bombing in tears over Trouble's amnesty proposal

A woman who lost both her parents in the 1987 IRA Remembrance Day bombing in Enniskillen has said her "heart is breaking" over the suggestion the government is set to announce an end to all prosecutions related to the Northern Ireland Troubles before 1998.

Wednesday, 14th July 2021, 11:52 am
Updated Wednesday, 14th July 2021, 12:07 pm
Ten civilians, including Mrs. Veitch's parents, William and Agnes Mullan, and a serving RUC police officer were killed when an IRA bomb exploded, without warning, near the cenotaph in Enniskillen town centre on Remembrance Day in November 1987.
Ten civilians, including Mrs. Veitch's parents, William and Agnes Mullan, and a serving RUC police officer were killed when an IRA bomb exploded, without warning, near the cenotaph in Enniskillen town centre on Remembrance Day in November 1987.

William and Agnes Mullan were both in their seventies when they were murdered when a bomb planted by the IRA exploded close to the cenotaph in Enniskillen town centre on November 8, 1987.

Mr. and Mrs. Mullan, eight other civilians (Wesley and Bertha Armstrong (aged 62 & 55), Kit and Jessie Johnston (aged 71 & 62), John Megaw (67), Alberta Quinton (72), Marie Wilson (20) and Samuel Gault (49) and serving RUC officer, Edward Armstrong were all killed in the blast.

Scores of people were also injured in the explosion.

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Mr. and Mrs. Mullan's daughter, Margaret Veitch, contacted BBC Radio Ulster programme The Stephen Nolan Show on Wednesday morning when she heard the government in Westminster is set to announce an end to all prosecutions related to the Northern Ireland Troubles before 1998.

"My father and mother and the other people who died have had absolutely no justice - we haven't had a penny spent on us.

"Thirty-four years after Enniskillen not one penny has spent.

"They are making a difference in victims - my father and mother's lives were equally important to all the other lives.

"I have got past anger - I am totally and utterly frustrated out of my mind because they don't care about us because we are no threat and that's how the British government is treating us."

Mrs. Veitch added: "My father was a chemist and my mother was an angel of a lady - all those people murdered in Enniskillen, they were denied their basic human right to life.

"See the like of Boris Johnson and Brandon Lewis?

"They don't care because they have never been involved - they should try living in Northern Ireland the way we lived.

"The British government don't care about us because we do not pose a threat to them.

"I don't know what to do with the rest of my life - my heart is breaking."

Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Brandon Lewis, MP, will set-out, at around 1.00pm, today the way in which the government intends to deal with legacy issues connected to the Troubles