DUP to ‘review position’ with Tories if Brexit deal passes Parliament

The DUP will consider withdrawing its support for the Conservative Party if the draft Brexit deal passes in Parliament, a DUP MP has said.

Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, the DUP chief whip, made the comments on BBC NI TV show The View.

Sir Jeffrey Donaldson

Sir Jeffrey Donaldson

The DUP’s backing, as part of a Confidence and Supply arrangement with the Tory Party, has been crucial in propping up Theresa May’s government.

Speaking on The View on Thursday night, Mr Donaldson said: “Let me be clear, in terms of this arrangement with the Conservative Party, our focus right now, understandably, is what happens with this deal. That is the most immediate priority.”

He continued: “And part of our agreement with the Conservative Party is the Brexit situation. So yes, if the Conservative Party decided and were successful in getting this deal through the House of Commons then, absolutely, we will have to review our position with regard to the confidence and supply agreement.”

His comments follow intense criticism of the draft Brexit withdrawal agreement in the House of Commons yesterday.

DUP Westminster leader Nigel Dodds told the Prime Minister that despite numerous private meetings she had not listened to concerns.

Theresa May was told her draft EU withdrawal agreement threatened the integrity of the UK and risked isolating Northern Ireland from the rest of the country.

Mr Dodds said: “I could today stand here and take the Prime Minister through the list of promises and pledges that she made to this House and to us privately about the future of Northern Ireland and the future relationship with the EU but I fear it would be a waste of time since she clearly doesn’t listen.”

Mr Dodds congratulated the Cabinet ministers who had so far resigned over the deal, adding: “The choice is now clear, we stand up for the United Kingdom, the whole of the United Kingdom, the integrity of the United Kingdom or we vote for a vassal state.”

The DUP’s Brexit spokesman Sammy Wilson said the deal was a case of “Northern Ireland being put on a platter as an object to surrender to the EU”.