Growing support for Camilla to become Queen

The Prince of Wales, and Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall, leave St George's Chapel, Windsor,after the blessing of their wedding 10 years ago
The Prince of Wales, and Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall, leave St George's Chapel, Windsor,after the blessing of their wedding 10 years ago

Nearly half of the British public believe the Duchess of Cornwall should become Queen Consort when the Prince of Wales accedes to the throne.

A new poll by YouGov ahead of Charles and Camilla’s 10th wedding anniversary reveals that 49 per cent think Camilla should take the traditional title of the wife of a reigning king, while 35 per cent believe she should be given a lesser title out of respect to Diana, Princess of Wales and 16 per cent were undecided.

When the Prince and Camilla became engaged in February 2005, only seven per cent of people polled by YouGov thought Camilla should one day be Queen.

Aides have always insisted the Duchess does not want to be known as Queen and intends to be known as Princess Consort instead.

But according to some legal experts, unless there is change in the law, Camilla will technically become Queen no matter what title she actually uses.

Most people (42 per cent) said they had neither a positive nor negative impression of Camilla, with 31 per cent saying they had a positive one and 23 per cent a negative one.

But the survey of 1,830 people also showed that 44 per cent believed Camilla was well prepared to be the wife of the reigning monarch, 13 per cent thought she was badly prepared and the remainder had no opinion or did not know.

Of those questioned, 50 per cent thought Camilla had carried out her duties as Duchess of Cornwall well – with 20 per cent saying she did this very well and 30 per cent fairly well. Only six per cent thought she had done badly in the role. Some 28 per cent had no opinion and 16 per cent did not know.

Nicola Wildash, research executive at YouGov, suggested it was more a case of people becoming used to Camilla, rather than a large surge in popularity.

“The further we get from Diana’s death, the less that will resonate in people’s minds. As soon as the public see something for years and years, they become more neutralised to the issue,” she said.

Figures from YouGov in June last year showed 53 per cent thought Camilla should one day become Queen Consort, 32 per cent believed she should have a lesser title and 14 per cent did not know.

But Ms Wildash said the slight decrease from 53 per cent to 49 per cent was not significant and part of a general small fluctuation.