BBC sports presenter Stephen Watson needs new kidney transplant

Sports reporter Stephen Watson is refusing to let his search for a new kidney get in the way of his work as a broadcast journalist.

The 47-year-old received a kidney from his father Cecil nearly 30 years ago and it was only during a recent TV programme he was producing about the renal unit at Belfast City Hospital that he found out he needed a new one.

Stephen Watson received his first kidney transplant from his father Cecil almost 30 years ago

Stephen Watson received his first kidney transplant from his father Cecil almost 30 years ago

“My first transplant has lasted nearly 30 years and I always knew that it would need replaced,” he told the Belfast Telegraph.

“I was aware that this day would end up coming ... but it has probably come sooner than I thought it was going to.”

Mr Watson currently has to endure five-hour dialysis sessions four mornings a week in the renal unit before reporting for work with the BBC.

Despite the gruelling schedule he said he has not missed a day at work due to sickness since he moved from UTV to BBC 20 years ago.

Stephen Watson at the inaugural Inspire Workplace Wellbeing Awards at the Crowne Plaza Hotel �Press Eye/Darren Kidd

Stephen Watson at the inaugural Inspire Workplace Wellbeing Awards at the Crowne Plaza Hotel �Press Eye/Darren Kidd

The golf and motor sports correspondent said: “I’ve had dialysis in Paris for the Ryder Cup, I’ve had it in Ballyliffin for the Irish Open and I’ve had it in Dundee for The Open.

“I’ve also got it planned for the Masters at Augusta this April, for the Isle of Man TT at the end of May and other places just in case a transplant doesn’t come along.”