Motion calling for Ireland to appeal Hooded Men case passes

Seven of the 14  'Hooded Men'. From left, Jim Auld, Patrick McNally, Liam Shannon, Fracncie McGuigan, Davy Rodgers, Brian Turley and Joe Clarke
Seven of the 14 'Hooded Men'. From left, Jim Auld, Patrick McNally, Liam Shannon, Fracncie McGuigan, Davy Rodgers, Brian Turley and Joe Clarke

A motion calling on the Irish government to challenge a finding that the treatment of the ‘Hooded Men’ did not amount to torture has been passed, according to Sinn Fein.

It put forward the motion on Wednesday following a ruling by the European Court of Human Rights in March that the treatment meted out to the group of 14 Catholics – who had been detained by the security forces during internment in 1971 – did not meet the definition of torture.

They were subject to hooding, stress positions, noise, and sleep and food deprivation.

The motion called on the upper house of the Irish parliament to back “the call from the victims of torture known as ‘The Hooded Men’ for the Government to appeal the decision of the European Court”.

Speaking before putting a motion before the Seanad, Sinn Fein senator Niall O Donnghaile said: “It’s about vindication for these men and what they went through but also the people who continue to suffer torture around the world.”

Although the Seanad’s official records (including the outcome of the vote) had not updated at time of writing last night, Sinn Fein issued a statement which said the motion had passed unanimously– sending “a clear and significant message to the government”.