Albert Clock ticking again after fortnight when time stood still

A passerby checks the time on her phone against the newly fixed Albert Clock
A passerby checks the time on her phone against the newly fixed Albert Clock

A Victorian-era clock tower is back in working order, more than two weeks after it was noticed to have ground to a halt.

The Albert Clock in Belfast stopped functioning on New Year’s Day.

The clock on January 3

The clock on January 3

The mid-19th century monument was erected on soft ground near the Lagan in the city centre, leading to its characteristic lopsided lean, and underwent major work about 15 years ago to help stabilise it.

One clock expert had told the News Letter that, in all likelihood, the problem did not lie with the original Victorian mechanism, but with more recently installed equipment which electronically winds the weights inside the clock back up to the top.

Raymond Farrelly, a 59-year-old clock restorer from Co Fermanagh, said mechanical clocks were “remarkable things – very, very well made and designed”.

Belfast City Council, which has responsibility for the monument’s repairs, confirmed that the problem did indeed lie with an electronic mechanism inside it.

The council said that the clock’s hands had begun moving again on Friday afternoon.

It said that the cost of repairing the gigantic monument had been less than £1,000.