Pilloried as ‘fascist’ in UK ahead of D-Day events, no wonder Trump was upset

Protesters in Trafalgar Square, London on the second day of the state visit to the UK by US President Donald Trump, June 4
Protesters in Trafalgar Square, London on the second day of the state visit to the UK by US President Donald Trump, June 4

President Donald Trump came to London to be greeted with a fusillade of abuse on June 3, 2019, welcomed as a fascist by the Mayor of London even before he had stepped off the plane.

He had come to honour the Americans who had helped to liberate Europe in the D-Day landings of June 6, 1944. No wonder he was upset.

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

He stayed at Winfield House, the official residence of the American Ambassador, Woody Johnson (such is the American way) on the nights of 3 and 4 June and at Doonbeg, Co Clare on the nights of June 5 and 6 in preparation for his visit to Omaha Beach and his meeting with the American Veterans there.

The 75th anniversary of D-Day is a source of great pride for the Americans on Omaha, the bloodiest of the beaches, and Utah – as well it may be.

Private Russell Pickett [an American D-Day veteran from Virginia whom Mr Trump met] was with A Company of the 116th Infantry Division. It was in the first wave.

It took losses worse than Pickett’s (and Pettigrew’s and Trimble’s) Virginians and Tennesseeans facing Winfield Scott Hancock’s II Corps of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg on July 3 1863.

Sometimes the Americans must wonder why they bothered coming to Devon and Cornwall in World War II.

As an Englishman I find it embarrassing that the British think that they can save the world by ignorant abuse.

Gerald Morgan, Dublin