Reported On This Day 280 Years Ago (August 14 1739): Ship from Virginia reports all well with British war vessels in America

The Belfast News Letter of August 3 1739 (August 14 in the modern calendar)
The Belfast News Letter of August 3 1739 (August 14 in the modern calendar)
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From the Belfast News Letter of August 3 1739 (which is August 14 in the modern calendar):

BELFAST.

Mr. Patrick Montgomery, master of the Speedwell of Air, with tobacco, who is drove in her by contrary winds, gives an account, that on the 25th of June last he saw the Hector, the Woolf, and the Plumborough ships of war, at James’s River in Virginia, and that the captains an all on board were well, and that there is nothing quietness in those parts.

PORT-NEWS.

Since my last arrived the Jane and Agnes, Alexander Alexander, and the John and Archibald, Thomas Henry, both from Irvin, with coals --- The Blessing, Mr. John Gordon, the Alexander, John Knight, both from Aberdeenwith Oat meal; and a sloop from the Highlands with Kelp.

Some Pots of Sweet-meats are to be sold, at Mr. Gordon’s Office, at a reasonable Rate.

ENGLAND.

Bristol, June 21.

Such a publick spirit appears at this juncture among our countrymen, that we hear several gentlemen at Bath are upon a project of raising by subscription a sum of money for fitting out a privateer of twenty guns, to make reprizals on the insolent and plundering Spaniards.

All our best ships that are fit for privateers happen at this time to be abroad.

DUBLIN.

Bristol, June 21.

Last Sunday arrived here several recruits to fill up the regiments of this kingdom.

SCOTLAND.

Edinburgh, July 19.

Express orders came down by last post, for putting the field artillery in the castle in good order, and greasing the carriages, that they may be ready at an hour’s warning.

LONDON. July 24.

We are assur’d that a marriage is concluded between prince Frederick of Hesse-Cassel, nephew to the king of Sweden, and the princess Mary, the fourth daughter of his Britannick majesty, and that the articles are actually sign’d.

[Mary, aged 16 at this time, was the second youngest daughter of George II]