Apprentice Boys talks with Bloody Sunday Trust ‘ongoing’

Apprentice Boys governor Graeme Stenhouse during the parade in Londonderry earlier this month
Apprentice Boys governor Graeme Stenhouse during the parade in Londonderry earlier this month
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The governor of the Apprentice Boys has said discussions with a group set up to help the families of those killed on Bloody Sunday are “ongoing”.

The Apprentice Boys met with the Bloody Sunday Trust on Wednesday evening for the first time since loyalist band members wore emblems in support of Soldier F at the Relief of Derry parade on August 10.

Members of the Clyde Valley Flute Band from Larne in Co Antrim marched with a Parachute Regiment insignia emblazoned with the letter ‘F’ on their shirt sleeves, while flanked by police during the parade.

The former Paratrooper, identified only as Soldier F, is facing prosecution for two murders on Bloody Sunday in Londonderry in 1972.

After the parade, Apprentice Boys governor Graeme Stenhouse said: “We had no prior knowledge of the band’s uniform, or this incident, until the conclusion of the main parade on Bond Street. We recognise this may have caused upset to many in the nationalist community.”

After the meeting on Wednesday, Bloody Sunday Trust chairman Tony Doherty said: “Members of the Bloody Sunday Trust and the Apprentice Boys of Derry had a cordial and constructive meeting this evening [Wednesday] to discuss the events of August 10 and to continue to work to restore relationships in the city.”

Mr Stenhouse told the News Letter yesterday that the discussions were “constructive and ongoing”.

Petrol bombs and missiles were thrown at police and near to the Apprentice Boys Memorial Hall on August 10.