Boris Johnson berated live on Facebook over 'unlawful' prorogation advice given to Queen

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, took part in a Peoples' Prime Minister's Questions on Facebook on Wednesday evening. (Photo/Video courtesy of U.K. Prime Minister/Facebook)
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, took part in a Peoples' Prime Minister's Questions on Facebook on Wednesday evening. (Photo/Video courtesy of U.K. Prime Minister/Facebook)
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Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, was berated live on Facebook on Wednesday evening by people angry with him after a Scottish court said the advice Mr. Johnson provided to the Queen over the decision to prorogue parliament was "unlawful".

Mr. Johnson took questions from the public shortly after 5:00pm on Wednesday.

Despite being asked numerous times to respond to the ruling by the court in Scotland, Mr. Johnson refused to discuss the matter.

Mr. Johnson also refused to answer questions on why the British government is refusing to publish in full a government report, called Operation Yellowhammer, on how a No Deal Brexit might impact upon the U.K.

Instead, the prime minister answered questions on homelessness, health and negotiations with the E.U.

"What does it say about the Union when the prime minister simply ignores Scottish law," wrote one man.

"Why did you mislead our monarch and the people, Mr. Johnson?," asked another.

One woman asked: "Mr. Johnson, can you honestly tell the people why you prorogued parliament?"

Another man quizzed: "If the U.K. Supreme Court in London upholds the ruling from Scotland, will you resign?."

Mr. Johnson reiterated what he said two weeks ago by insisting his decision to prorogue parliament was to facilitate a Queen's speech in October.

While many used the forum to scrutinise the prime minister there were those who offered messages of support.

"Carry on fighting for our referendum Boris [Johnson]," said one woman.

"I rest easy at night knowing you are in charge, Mr. Johnson," declared another.

Parliament was officially prorogued in the early hours of Tuesday until October 14, 2019.

There has been cross-party criticism of Mr. Johnson by opposition leaders who accused the prime minister of proroguing parliament to try and force through a No Deal Brexit on October 31, 2019.

A group of M.P.s, led by Scottish National Party M.P. and Q.C., Joanna Cherry, claimed Mr. Johnson's decision to suspend parliament was unlawful.

However, last week, Judge Lord Doherty ruled that the prorogation of parliament was lawful.

The group of M.P.s appealed the decision at Inner House, the most supreme civil court in Scotland, ruled against the British government by declaring the advice given by Boris Johnson to the Queen concerning the suspension of parliament "unlawful".

The government will appeal the ruling in the U.K. Supreme Court in London on Tuesday.