What is a weather bomb?

If you've ever wondered what a weather bomb is then we have everything you need to know right here.

What is a weather bomb?

The official term for a weather bomb is an explosive cyclogenesis.

An explosive cyclogenesis is a low pressure system that sees it drop 24 millibars within 24 hours.

The Met Office has forecast that an explosive cyclogenesis could result in very strong winds across Northern Ireland on Friday December 7, 2018.

An explosive cyclogenesis occurs when: "rapid acceleration of air caused by the jet stream high up in the atmosphere can remove air from the column, reducing its weight so causing pressure to fall at sea level," reads the definition of a weather bomb on the Met Office website.

The Met Office has issued a severe weather warning for Northern Ireland.

The Met Office has issued a severe weather warning for Northern Ireland.

"This in turn sucks in air which converges from surrounding regions resulting in faster and faster rotation of the circulation, in the same way that ice skaters spin faster by drawing their arms in. The resulting winds peak over a period of a few hours and can be strong enough to bring down trees and cause structural damage."

The yellow status severe weather warning of wind issued by the Met Office on Tuesday morning is valid between 3:00am and 11:59pm on Friday December 7, 2018.