EU playing fast and loose with security concerns by using NI as political weapon

Theresa May
Theresa May

We are told the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement means there has to be EU law across the island of Ireland. Quite the opposite is in fact the case.

The Belfast Agreement – endorsed by a vote across the island of Ireland - actually accepted the partition of Ireland, removed the Irish constitution’s territorial claim and accepted that Northern Ireland is a part of the UK, unless and until its people vote to accept a united Ireland. That has not happened.

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

Therefore, Northern Ireland remains a part of the UK and, like the rest of the UK, will leave the EU on March 31, 2019. It is unacceptable that Northern Ireland would be treated like a part of the EU and not a part of the UK. To force Northern Ireland to remain a part of the EU and not the UK would in fact be against both the letter and the spirit of the Belfast Agreement.

Our prime minister is right to insist no British prime minister could accept anything other than Northern Ireland remaining a full part of the UK. To do otherwise is to dismiss democracy, both that of the people of Northern Ireland in their desire to remain a part of the UK and the result of the UK Brexit vote to leave the EU.

The EU is playing fast and loose with security concerns by using Northern Ireland as a political weapon. We are led to believe that because of a democratic decision – the Brexit vote – republicans in Northern Ireland will now return to violence to achieve their political aim of a united Irish republic. The law abiding people of Northern Ireland had to accept, as a result of democracy, that a terrorist was now a minister in their government.

Republicans have declared they have laid down their arms and now support democracy and the rule of law – now is the test of the truth of their declarations – if they cannot accept a democratic vote to leave the EU then they are not democrats.

Andrew Wright

Cullybackey