Federalise Labour and the UK

The political reality is the fact that Labour's leader has looked both too young and, in political terms, immature. Photo: Yui Mok/PA Wire
The political reality is the fact that Labour's leader has looked both too young and, in political terms, immature. Photo: Yui Mok/PA Wire

The Labour Party need to discount from consideration/election to be the next leader of the Labour party, those MPs who were first elected as recently as 2010.

It would be a profound mistake not to recognise that there is a clamour amongst my generation for the leader of the Labour Party to have the gravitas and maturity that comes from many years in public and parliamentary life.

Letters

Letters

To be frank, that has been part of the problem over the past five years. The political reality is the fact that Labour’s leader has looked both too young and, in political terms, immature.

More importantly, he also appointed far too many Shadow ministers (into major portfolios) who had only been in parliament five minutes!

Too many members of Labour’s front bench team are “anonymous” to the general public ,and unknown to most Labour party members. Who for instance had ever heard of Liz Kendall until yesterday?

Gravitas, maturity and experience are essential qualities for the next leader of the opposition. To win the next general election the Labour Party needs to win back the “Silver Surfer Vote”.

At the general election last week, Labour lost the baby-boomers’ generation.

I would also like to add: The new leader also needs to have a brand-new back-room team ie in the leader’s office at the Brewers Green headquarters. The new Leader must not ‘recycle’ the same tired team or the same advisors, many of them who have never had a real jobs in their lives!

A fresh start is needed and fresh thinking.

There needs to be four separate and equal Labour parties, one each for: England; Scotland; Wales and Northern Ireland, with four separate leaders, four separate NEC’s, four separate conferences who ‘come together’ merely in order to fight the United Kingdom elections, every five years (and to select Labour’s candidate for prime minister).

Basically the Labour party needs to be federalised (as does the UK!)”

The structure I propose is not rocket science. It is how the Labour parties (and other parties) organise in Australia and Canada.

Andrew Mackinlay

Labour MP Thurrock 1992 - 2010