Having failed to get their way through violence republicans now use Gaelic as a political threat

Use of Irish as a threat is an insult to the likes of Douglas Hyde, above, and Presbyterians who helped keep it alive
Use of Irish as a threat is an insult to the likes of Douglas Hyde, above, and Presbyterians who helped keep it alive

Speaking Gaelic here isn’t prohibited here is it? So if there was all that much appetite for Gaelic in the six counties, except among Sinn Fein political agitators of course, would you not expect some natural gaeltachts?

True, there are some native Gaelic speakers in the Glens of Antrim, who ironically also speak broadest Ulster Scots.

Letters

Letters

Other than, apart from the artificially created “gaeltacht” around the Falls which is really more for show than serious, there don’t seem to be any natural gaeltachts.

On the other hand Ulster Scots, without any fuss, except for “me too” merchants using comparison to Gaelic to grab some questionably used funding, is alive and well.

All over the six counties not forgetting parts of Donegal too, from childhood and without need of special schooling, in homes, pubs, clubs, shops, churches Ulster Scots is spoken day and daily.

Having failed using violence to get their way republicans are now using Gaelic as a transparent political threat. It is a shameful insult to the memory of the likes of Douglas Hyde and 19th and early 20th century Presbyterians who helped to keep the language alive not by political blackmail but by teaching people its cultural value.

Davy Wight, Carrickfergus