How did Russian weapon of mass destruction enter UK?

Police in protective suits at The Maltings shopping centre, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill, after the nerve agent attack. Photo: Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Police in protective suits at The Maltings shopping centre, where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found critically ill, after the nerve agent attack. Photo: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

The past seven days have seen the British security services give assurances that the element used to attempt to kill a Russian whistleblower and his daughter was a nerve agent that was manufactured in Russia.

There has been a huge outcry against the Russians and this has obviously been replicated in Parliament with the prime minister and the leader of the opposition trading blows on who is culpable for the attack.

Letters

Letters

This appalling attack on British soil which invades British sovereignty has been condemned by several Allies and Nato. But it also seems that this is a time when the government has started a system of smoke and mirrors to stop the real questions from being asked.

Namely how did a Russian weapon of mass destruction enter the UK, how much is here, who administered it and where are they.

There could potentially be a large amount of a WMD that could theoretically wipe out swathes of the population.

This might sound like scare-mongering but it is fact that this was used, and it seems that the security forces are playing catch up and being used to reassure the public that a bit of blot bang rub with some fullers earth will dissipate the threat and leave the country safe.

This shows how much we as the UK need our allies.

After years of shrinking our own security forces we may very well be seen as a soft target.

Mrs Thatcher, although not everyone’s favourite, was named the Iron Lady and as such helped to bring Russia into Glasnost,

Donald Trump, not everyone’s favourite, has brought the North Koreans to the negotiating table by standing up to a bully and showing strength.

It must therefore be time to front up and be tough with any country, state or entity that challenges the UK’s democratic right to protect its self against attack.

K.J. Turner, Connor