Ireland’s crucial marriage vote

Christians, Catholic and Protestant, have serious concerns about a possible Yes in Friday's referendum
Christians, Catholic and Protestant, have serious concerns about a possible Yes in Friday's referendum

There was a time when the notion of same sex “marriage” would have been laughed to scorn in Ireland – or, for that matter, anywhere else in the world.

The institution of marriage has, after all, been virtually unquestioned for thousands of years – that is, until common sense became out-of-date.

Letters

Letters

Despite the polls in London’s Sunday Times, which suggest that the teachings of the church belong to an antediluvian age, there is no evidence to support the unseemly notion of “marriage” between two persons of the same gender.

Roman Catholic Archbishop Eamon Martin told the newspaper: “There were ‘no grounds’ for considering gay unions to be ‘even remotely analogous to God’s plan for marriage and family.’”

He is not alone. Ireland’s Christians – Catholic and Protestant alike – have serious concerns about today’s vote to legitimise what is clearly antithetical to the teachings of the Church and Holy Scripture.

When men choose not to believe in God,” wrote G.K. Chesterton, “they do not thereafter believe in nothing, they then become capable of believing in anything.”

Brian Stuckey,

Denver, Colorado