SF do not want devolution to work

Sinn Fein leaders Gerry Adams and Michelle O'Neill with newly elected Sinn Fein MLAs at Stormont earlier this year. 'Photo by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye
Sinn Fein leaders Gerry Adams and Michelle O'Neill with newly elected Sinn Fein MLAs at Stormont earlier this year. 'Photo by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye

Mixed messages seem to be coming from the British and Irish governments regarding talks in Northern Ireland.

One government can say there is progress and then the other one can say there is none.

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

Broadcasters and journalists seem to be having the same problem in reporting the outcome of talks and any conclusion coming out of them.

All sorts of conflicting information is now coming at us.

Well-known examples such as:

“There has been some agreement, but problems still remain.”

“There has been progress, but no substantial progress.”

“The parties are near agreement but there are details and outstanding matters remaining.”

“There is still hope of a deal, but there is still no agreement on key issues”.

We have heard it all before and it is no longer credible if it ever was in holding out hope with the usual qualifications.

The inconsistency of information coming from Northern Ireland’s talks is as ridiculous as the talks themselves which are now farcical and twisted, given that they have been going on for so long and without resolution.

It is never going to work because Sinn Féin do not want devolution, unlike the DUP and other unionist parties, but want a united Ireland instead, which is a completely different thing. Does anybody really believe that Sinn Féin will settle for a devolution?

Not a chance.

They are only pussy footing around with devolution while they try to hollow out the Union as much as they can with demands of a Irish language act and recriminating others for their failure to agree.

It should be remembered that Sinn Féin were the ones who failed to nominate a first minister and brought down the institutions spurred on by the Brexit decision.

Politics in Northern Ireland is now so ridiculous and inane it merits no attention from the public, who are foaming at the mouth from statements, suspensions, deadlocks, impasses, and endless recriminations.

It is a merry-go-round without end with the Good Friday/Belfast Agreement almost twenty years old since its signing in 1998 and there are still outstanding matters!

The sooner direct rule is fully brought back, the better, to end the hopelessness and futility of it all.

Maurice Fitzgerald, Shanbally, County Cork