Unionists can use their brains

Chris McGimpsey, above right with David Trimble in 2003, and his  brother showed public spiritedness in their legal case in Dublin against the 1985 AIA
Chris McGimpsey, above right with David Trimble in 2003, and his brother showed public spiritedness in their legal case in Dublin against the 1985 AIA

Chris McGimpsey’s article (November 19) on the court battles of the McGimpsey brothers, backed by Ken Maginnis, against the Anglo Irish Agreement (AIA) and over the implications of the claims over Northern Ireland by de Valera’s Constitution of Eire (Ireland) is not only an illustration that Unionism “could use its brains” in advancing the two Irelands on the island, it is also an illustration to others of a public spiritedness.

It deserves to be pondered and filed by politicians and would-be-politicians in N. Ireland who think, when jobs come up, that they should be rewarded for doing their bit, irrespective of everything else.

But might there be a further dimension to what Chris McGimpsey relates? On first applying to enter what has since become the EU there were fears, on the part of Dublin’s civil servants (as I remember documents on release later revealed) that the UK might try to block the Republic’s application for entry – a requirement on entry being that members (and would-be members) should not have claims on others.

Dublin at the time seemingly offended against that in its territorial claim. But it was there always looming in the background and the Republic would have to accommodate itself to it as it did initially tacitly with London, then openly to which the McGimpsey court cases contributed.

W A Miller, Belfast BT13

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Chris McGimpsey on the AIA