THROUGH THE ARCHIVES: Iron steamer falls foul of Co Down coastline

From the News Letter, February 24, 1884

By Darryl Armitage
Wednesday, 24th February 2021, 6:00 am
Between two and three o’clock on February 2 1884 a large four-masted iron steamer named the Guy Mannering had fallen foul of the treacherous Co Down coast, reported the News Letter on this day in 1884. Picture: Rossographer/Geograph
Between two and three o’clock on February 2 1884 a large four-masted iron steamer named the Guy Mannering had fallen foul of the treacherous Co Down coast, reported the News Letter on this day in 1884. Picture: Rossographer/Geograph

Between two and three o’clock on February 22 a large four-masted iron steamer named the Guy Mannering had fallen foul of the treacherous Co Down coast, reported the News Letter on this day in 1884.

The Guy Mannering, which was owned by Mr F G Langlands of Bristol, struck the Cannon Rock near Cloughey Bay.

She had been sailing from Rangoon to the Clyde with a cargo of teak and had a crew of 43 men and one passenger and was commanded by Captain Largey.

Once the Guy Mannering had struck Cannon Rock the lifeboats had been lowered into the sea and the crew and passenger were able to make their way to safety without any difficulty.

After landing on coast they were taken to Newtownards and then on to the Sailor’s Home on Corporation Street where “Captain Gilpin, the superintendant, treated them with his usual kindness”.

The News Letter’s correspondent noted that the Guy Mannering did not remain on the rocks at Cloughey for too long and was soon refloated and brought round to Belfast Lough, but as she was taking on a lot of water she was run on to the Oyster Bank. The paper believed that the ship had sustained considerable damage and that her engines were kept constantly going to prevent any further water accumulating. Much praise was given to the coastguards at Cloughey who had “rendered every assistance from the time the vessel struck until she was got off”.