Former Justice Minister challenges PM's legacy claims

Former Northern Ireland Justice Minister David Ford has accused the Prime Minister of 'coming close to political interference' after she described proposed plans for investigating the Troubles as 'unfair'.

A soldier on the streets of Northern Ireland in 1999. Concerns have been raised at UK Cabinet level that plans to deal with the legacy of the Troubles may leave them unprotected. Photo: PACEMAKER
A soldier on the streets of Northern Ireland in 1999. Concerns have been raised at UK Cabinet level that plans to deal with the legacy of the Troubles may leave them unprotected. Photo: PACEMAKER

Theresa May told the House of Commons yesterday that only people in the armed forces or law enforcement were being investigated but that terrorists should be investigated too.

But Mr Ford challenged her comments.

The Alliance Party MLA for South Antrim said that a draft consultation document on dealing with legacy matters - released to political parties this week - did not include provision for a so-called statute of limitations.

“Yet the Prime Minister seems to put it back in,” he told the BBC.

“That is completely unhelpful and in fact dishonours the memory of the vast numbers who served in uniform and did their duty honestly, properly and at personal risk by defending those who broke the law.

“It seems to me what the prime minister has done has come close to political interference.”