Maybe we need a new unionist party to take up the fight for unionist survival

Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill and First Minister Arlene Foster with Irish and UK leaders at Stormont on Monday. "Where did 'not feeding the crocodile' go? Or no Irish language act 'on my watch'?"
Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill and First Minister Arlene Foster with Irish and UK leaders at Stormont on Monday. "Where did 'not feeding the crocodile' go? Or no Irish language act 'on my watch'?"
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The recent agreement is yet another cave in by the DUP to the aggression of Sinn Fein/IRA.

Being led by a lame duck leader who seems determined to save her own career after the disastrous RHI scandal has made unionism even weaker.

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

I think that the DUP may have scored an own goal. Where did the ‘not feeding the crocodile’ go?

Or no Irish language act ‘on my watch’?

There is little doubt there has been blackmail against unionists.

This even happened over the abortion law, with some church leaders wanting the DUP to cave in to the so-called republican/nationalist parties on issues such as the Irish language.

The nationalist parties, despite overwhelmingly having a Roman Catholic support base, seemed to be in agreement on the new abortion law or could at least live with it, but their determination to get an Irish language act seemed to take precedence.

It seems that beating the Prods in any circumstances was more important than abortion.

Then Julian Smith came out with the statement that the DUP were holding up the process, which put more pressure on the DUP.

So the DUP has capitulated and allowed our Britishness to be further eroded.

Trying to counter an Irish language commissioner with an Ulster Scots is an expensive folly.

I feel that the DUP could become less significant as a party and end up like the Ulster Unionist Party. Maybe we need a new united unionist party to take up the fight for our very survival as unionists.

If we do not, we may find that our children could be like unionists who were left in the Republic after partition, keeping their heads down or emigrating.

The liberal unionists who voted for non-unionist parties and weakened the unionist hand may now reap what they have sown. If anybody really thinks that this is a turning point in Northern Ireland as a country for stable government, think again!

It is another slip on the slippery road to a united Ireland.

It also concerns me when the moderator of my own church, and other churches, welcomed the deal to restore Stormont that they seem to know little about.

Maybe they think that they are doing the will of God by encouraging compromise no matter how morally wrong that compromise could prove to be.

The letter by Dr Edaward Cooke (‘There is a growing gap between unionists and the unionist elite,’ January 11), stating how he believed that the unionist working class are being further alienated from the unionist elite, may not be too far off the mark.

John Mulholland, Doagh