Many of us in England would help fund civil cases against terrorists

It is clear in the aftermath of Lord Kerr’s judgement in the case of Gerry Adams that many of the victims of terrorism will continue to feel abandoned by the state.

Monday, 25th May 2020, 10:48 pm
Updated Monday, 25th May 2020, 11:51 pm
The Supreme Court in London ruled that Gerry Adams' internment was unlawful and so were his convictions

It is clear in the aftermath of Lord Kerr’s judgement in the case of Gerry Adams that many of the victims of terrorism will continue to feel abandoned by the state.

To them, it must seem like the most powerful organs in the land have given up on the search for justice.

No victim should ever be left in this position and effectively told ‘get over your trauma and move on’.

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There is good precedent for using civil action against terrorists, as Trevor Ringland suggests (‘The Supreme Court ruling in the Gerry Adams case walked on graves of judges murdered by IRA’).

Not too long ago a Scottish court awarded a woman damages of £80,000 against the man who raped her. This was despite her rapist getting off in a criminal trial.

Even more pertinent is the successful civil action against the IRA terrorist John Downey by the victims of the Hyde Park bombing.

Finally, may I use your pages to reassure victims and others concerned with this injustice that there are many in England who would welcome an opportunity to contribute the funds necessary to get cases to court.

David McDowell, London SW1