The Irish Sea border is so bad that if unionists don’t even try to stop it then they give a green light to joint authority or a united Ireland

A letter from Mr RG McDowell:

By RG McDowell
Sunday, 21st February 2021, 7:33 am
Updated Sunday, 21st February 2021, 8:12 am
If unionism feels it cannot oppose something so detrimental to its interests as the Irish Sea border it is surely a green light to pursue joint authority and eventual unification
If unionism feels it cannot oppose something so detrimental to its interests as the Irish Sea border it is surely a green light to pursue joint authority and eventual unification

The Irish Sea border is so bad for unionism that only joint authority or a united Ireland could really be worse.

If unionist leaders across a variety of groupings do not believe we should collapse the assembly as a result of the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) having been abolished by the Irish Sea border then they should be straight with unionist people that we should simply accept the new border.

The danger with this is that if unionism feels it cannot oppose something which is clearly so detrimental to its interests it is surely a green light to pursue joint authority and eventual unification.

Letter to the editor

If we cannot oppose the first how can we oppose the second or third.

I believe unionism should at least try to oppose the Irish Sea Border. Threatening to collapse the GFA institutions would have had more impact during negotiations than by opposing a border which already exists but the longer we leave it the less likely it will be to succeed.

The added complication of Covid makes all opposition difficult.

I suggest unionist ministers should write resignation letters dated midday on 12th July 2021 stating that it cannot be business as usual for the GFA structures when the agreement has been so fundamentally breached for unionists.

This would give Robin Swann time to try to have the Covid situation as under control as possible before potentially handing control to London. It will also give the two governments a window of opportunity to devise a solution which will alleviate unionist concerns.

If they haven’t removed the border by July under the pressure of petitions and lobbying they are never going to. While it is a desperate move it is the only card unionism has to play if its serious about bringing pressure to bare for the removal of an Irish Sea Border.

If unionism really doesn’t believe it can win this fight then it may as well start having discussions around what type of United Ireland it wants, repartition of the most unionist areas of Northern Ireland into Britain or financial support for the resettlement of unionists to Britain.

After all if we can’t stop this how would you stop Irish unification if the governments forced it upon us.

Mr RG McDowell, Belfast BT5

We have received many letters against the Irish Sea border, Here are some of them:

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